There's a saying that goes something like this: any publicity is good publicity; even bad publicity. The argument is that any type of publicity can end of as good publicity. In a way that makes sense. Even if you're in the public eye for something that would bring negative attention to you that still means that people are talking about you, even if it is for all the wrong reasons.

However, if you own an art gallery or retail shop you're going to want all the good publicity that you can get. Perhaps you are even an athlete hoping to make the Olympic games and are looking for endorsements. Bad publicity for your business will drive potential clients away; good publicity will bring them in. Same with companies looking to endorse an athlete or celebrity. It's the good kind of publicity you want to aim for as a business owner.

There are a lot of good ways of promoting your business, and if you play your cards right, will land you new clients, which is especially important if you're a new business trying to take a bite out of your competition.

One example of good publicity is hosting a grand opening at your business location that gives out free food and beverages as well as free samples of the products or services you sell. You want to bring the community to your business and there's no better attraction than free stuff, whether it's cupcakes for new clients or dog treats for dog kennel business in London.

Another way of reeling in new clients is by marketing sales and promotions. If you're a dentist for example, you can advertise special prices for cavity checks to lure in new clients. If you own a computer repair shop that also sells parts you can put on a promotion where new customers can get a free USB stick with any printer inspection. It's things like that where good publicity will play a part in seeing your business grow.

You just want to make sure that everything is in order when it comes to promoting your store and offering free stuff or deals. Nothing can turn good publicity into bad publicity quicker than saying your company will be selling the latest smartphone at a discount only to find out you didn't order enough stock for the demand.




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